(Source: iraffiruse)





thefoodhereisdisgusting:

That time in which Mamrie, Grace, and Hannah absolutely NAIL it.

(Source: ourdrunkitchen)





stutteringconfessions:

"white history month" "straight pride" "men’s rights movement"

image



janecrocker:

janecrocker:

i will always laugh so fucking hard at the urbandictionary entry for “fo shizzle my nizzle”

image

(Source: bromoyed)



(Source: fvnbvn)



frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.

Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.

The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.

When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.

Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.

Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.

There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.

Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.

Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.

One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.



Sugar Free Chocolate Ice-Creams

Ingredients:

  • 400ml coconut cream
  • 2-3 tablespoons rice malt syrup
  • 1/3 cup desiccated coconut
  • 1 tablespoon of organic cacao powder

Method:

Place all ingredients in a food processor or high power blender and mix until completely combined. Pour mixture into ice-cream/popsicle moulds and freeze for at least 4 hours. 

Enjoy!

(Note: Recipe is my own spin on the Candy Cane Ice Cream from the IQS Christmas Cookbook)



This makes me so fucking angry.

This makes me so fucking angry.

(Source: ihatemylifesoismokeitaway)



necrophilofthefuture:

when girls say “i was born in the wrong decade!!” “i belong in the 20’s!!!” “i wish guys were still old fashioned gentlemen!”

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are u sure about that 



No thank you, I’m just looking.
Ancient retail proverb (via fuckinq)

(Source: thighrabanks)



irony-rocks:

animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

irony-rocks:

animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. 

Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. 

After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. 

To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”

For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.

To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.

A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”



mydrunkkitchen:

troyesivan:

tinywingscraftshop:

bagofscones:

cozywarmhappythings:

The joys of a cup of tea.

This is why I drink about 5 cups of tea a day.

Must. Drink. Moar. Tea.

are we forgetting that it tastes like a warm cup of home and liquid love

Teas pleasing me.



One. Do not promise when you’re happy.
Two. When you are angry, do not respond.
Three. Do not decide when you’re sad.
Wisdom (via soulist-aurora)